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20121027
20121104
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next issue is about energy, and we will start with ursala rozum. governor cuomo must to shut down indian point nuclear power point with supplies about a third of the electricity of new york city. do you support them in that effort? rozum: yes, i do support the governor to close indian point. i hope that he will take up a similar effort to eventually shut down the nuclear power plants along ontario. i think nuclear power, it's an energy source of the past. is expensive. it should not be relying on federal subsidies anymore. the national academy of sciences has said that any level of radiation from a nuclear power plant is dangerous to our health. so we need to be moving forward. the costs of nuclear power are socialized, and the health care costs that we have are people that are exposed to radiation. i do support, i support governor cuomo's efforts and to support a transition to renewable clean energy economy, and save economy that does not rely on fossil fuels or nuclear power. >> moderator: dan maffei, would you support what the governor wants to do by closing indian point? maffe
out a definitive and unambiguous energy policy. [laughter] this is, obviously, mr. speaker, an appropriate day to be considering this recommendation on energy after the last 20 -- it's good to see the business secretary down the bench, by the way. i'm sorry that growth committee that he's on is so unmemorable that he can't remember it. this is an appropriate day to be considering this recommendation. so his energy -- i'm rather enjoying this, mr. speaker. his energy secretary, his energy secretary says he's against wind farms and enough is enough. well, if -- >> order. order. let me just say the government back benches is very straightforward, they either calm down, or the session will be extended at whoever's inconvenience that may involve. let's just be very clear, incredibly straightforward. ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, the energy minister says he's against wind farms and enough is enough while his energy secretary is gung ho for them. who speaks for his government? >> well, today the jokes have been bad and the substance has been bad too. it's not a good day. i tell you
's one way. the second piece is the notion of almost like a hacker fund. let's take an issue. energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, the low carbon city, writes? which is very much off the building environment and let's see if we can move outside the building space into the district space so to speak. are these competing visions or they complementary and can we imagine with all this doubling up of tech expertise here that we can begin to move some of the coproduce solutions quicker? >> echo production in this case is possible when and if something's happened. so dte in the city and key institutions like worsening in the university have to get together and say we want transparent the run energy consumption are building. was it going to take to have a dashboard that you and i can access on your smartphone or kids can access in their schoolrooms are parents and home double tell them which of the schools of the city school district are cleaner and greener and smarter than others. something that would require collaboration, that would have been utility to share the data. a lot of ci
of the united states, our country is going to become energy self-sufficient at some point. i mean, i'm not saying it's going to happen tomorrow. but that is going to be a huge game changer. so even on what has been described as our achilles heel for years and years, this notion of this perennially and declining weak u.s. economy, even that's going to be changing. and when you're a country like japan, for example, looking at, you know, off-the-table type demographics where japan which has now gone from 128 million people at its peak now down to -- in our children's lifetime, we're looking at 70 million people, manager like that. when you look at japan that is fore swearing nuclear energy because of last year's catastrophe and looking at these huge increases in lng and things like that, and then you look at the united states, you know, we are going to be a very, very big, big player for years to come for a lot of reasons including and especially our economy. so i think it is really a good time to look at this, because we are not in any kind of declining mode. we're going to be even mor
ahead of iran which is under sanctions. not bad. remember the oil energy issue? good. now, washington complains, washington's been complaining about iraqi support to the assad regime and acquiescence to iranian pressure to do so. and hence, there could be problems in the deliveries of the f-16s, a delay while things sort themselves out. after all, baghdad's violating internationally-imposed sanctions. you all know what that means. yes, right on the mark. so here's the dilemma for maliki and for the united states, what do we do? and, remember, i don't think that maliki, i don't think he's an iranian tool or an american tool or anybody else's. he has his own, he's got his own strategy and his own goals in this game. so what do we do? if, for example, if i were in baghdad making decisions and like maliki i'm interested in building a stronger and effective iraq, i might say to myself, gee, i've got to rethink my policy towards assad. but i don't know if he's thinking that or not, he could be. he's kind of cagey. now, if assad stays in power -- not thinking like maliki, but thinking in gen
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5